2.5D, art from refuse, artist, artist palette, british, bronze, commentary on english economic difficulties, discarded household items, global warming, greenwash, greenwashing, liverpool, map of uk, policeman, prescient, repurposing, resource gobbling, rubbish, sculptures on walls and floors, self portrait?, stacking, surplus building materials, tony cragg, trash into art

trash into art long before we were greenwashed.

tony cragg began his art career making sculptures from refuse. the act of repurposing others’ discards automatically provided cragg with thematic concerns that sustained his work for decades. early in his career, he constructed sculptures by stacking, splitting and crushing discarded construction materials. circa 1978 he began to collect plastic fragments [found rubblsh] and arranged them into color categories (my personal favorite period of his art). these sculptures took on a 2.5D quality; all were mounted on floors and walls that created silhouette-ish images. this period of cragg’s ouvre consists of broken pieces of found rubbish and when first shown, were interpreted as a commentary on the economic difficulties face by england at the time. we can now reinterpret the work as prescient commentary of the current global warming, resource gobbling and polluted world in which we live.

cragg’s current work has unfortunately succumbed to that of the successful artist: bronze sculptures. while they are conceptually interesting, none pack the powerful eco-conscious thought of the previous works. (tony cragg [b. 1949 in l’pool] is a british born sculptor and artist who has lived in germany since 1977.)

 

early work: 1975

early work: 1975

a view of the UK of the north

a view of the UK of the north

 

universal image

universal image

ubiquitous image of artist

ubiquitous image of artist

 

subtle lunar image

subtle lunar image

policeman from early '80s

policeman from early '80s

self-portrait??

self-portrait??

 

more current work, commentary of hollow interiors. (social commentary?)

more current work, commentary of hollow interiors. (social commentary?)

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